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How to Prepare Your Farm Fencing for the Winter

Farm fence in winter

 

As a farmer, you’re probably well-aware of the amount of work that goes into preparing for the winter months. Among other things, you have to be sure that your fences are in prime condition and effectively winterized before the first big snow hits.

 

The last thing you want is to get stuck dealing with a broken fence in sub-zero temperatures. Here’s what you should do to get your fences ready.

 

Clear branches and vines


Cut away any vines or branches that are hanging over your fences. In the winter, there’s the risk of strong winds or heavy snow causing branches to break off trees and fall onto the fence below. Naturally, you’ll want to avoid this scenario. You may also want to clear away the brush surrounding your fences to make it easier to access if you need to make any repairs in the coming months.

 

Check for broken fence posts


If a fence post is weak or broken, not only is the fence not secure but there’s also a greater chance of a winter storm knocking it down. Look for obvious damage to fence posts and check for weaknesses by giving them a solid push in either direction. If the post moves significantly when you do so, it should probably be replaced.

 

Inspect all your gates


It’s important that your gates are able to open and close all season long, so make sure they’re about a foot off the ground. If your gates are sagging, it’s more likely that they’ll get stuck in the ice and snow. To fix this, you may need to tighten the hinges.

 

Make sure wires are taut and intact


Your wire fencing, electric or otherwise, won’t keep your livestock secure if the wires are broken, so give them a once-over before winter hits. Wire fences should remain taut, so any loose fences will need to be tightened or otherwise repaired. Non-electric wire fences should be fastened securely to their posts, so be on the lookout for missing staples and replace them as needed. For electric fences, keep an eye out for poor grounding, which is indicated by insufficient voltage.

 

Farm fences and gates in Southern Ontario


Are you thinking about adding a new enclosure or replacing your old farm fencing? If so, Ontario Wholesale Farm Direct is here to help! Contact us today to learn more about our products or get a free quote.

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